Formula 1……….is another “male” barrier about to fall? (let us hope so)

Carmen Jorda has joined Lotus F1 as a development driver, becoming the second female to hold a Formula One back-up position after Williams’ Susie Wolff.

The 26-year-old daughter of former driver Jose Miguel Jorda has been on the professional circuit for more than a decade and competed in last year’s GP3 feeder series. She will join Lotus for a year, working with their simulator programme, as well as attending Grands Prix and tests.

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Like Wolff, who was promoted from a similar role to that of test driver earlier this year, Jorda will also have the chance to earn a drive in the F1 car.

“It feels like a dream come true to join Lotus F1 Team,’ said the Spaniard. I’ve been racing since I was 10 years old so it was my dream to drive a Formula 1 car since I was very young. Joining Lotus F1 Team is a big step towards my goal. I will be working to improve myself as a driver as well as helping the team to develop the car by testing new developments in the simulator; it’s such a fantastic opportunity. I know this is just the beginning and the biggest challenge is yet to come but already being part of a team with such a history is a real honour. This is a great achievement, but an even greater opportunity which will lead to bigger and better things.”

Lotus F1 Team CEO, Matthew Carter, added: “We are happy to announce Carmen Jorda as a Development Driver for Lotus F1 Team and we are looking forward to working with her over the course of the season and ultimately seeing her behind the wheel of the car. Carmen will bring a fresh perspective to the team.”

“We have a strong programme for her attending Grands Prix as well as extensive time in our sophisticated simulation facility at Enstone. She is a unique addition to the team and we are looking forward to helping her progress her goals as well as receiving the benefit of her insights and contributions to the development of the E23 Hybrid.”

 

 

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